HomePosts Tagged "rural southwest alabama"

In 2002, the Museum of Fine Arts in Houston, Texas, presented an exhibition of 70 quilts from Gee’s Bend, Alabama. The story goes that art collector William Arnett came across a photograph of one of the quilts while working on a history of African American vernacular art. He set out to find the quilt, and its maker, and arrived in Gee’s Bend. Arnett ultimately introduced the women of Gee's Bend and their quilts to the world, but not many people have actually visited the source. Recently, a group of Auburn architecture students and community leaders from Gee's Bend set out to change that.

Read More

by Erin Z. Bass On June 12, Alabama lost its beloved storyteller Kathryn Tucker Windham. Unfortunately, I never got the chance to meet Kathryn. I first heard about her while on a tour of rural Alabama a few years ago. Our guide, Linda Vice, told some of Kathryn's stories to us and even took us by her house in Selma, but the storyteller wasn't home. At the Kathryn Tucker Windham Museum in Thomasville, we learned more about her life and legacy in the community. Many of you know we're working on a Southern Literary Trail application here at Deep South, and the museum definitely made our list of literary sites. I'd like to share our app entry on the Kathryn Tucker Windham Museum as a tribute to her today and hope you'll all click here to listen to Kathryn talk about her experience with ghosts on YouTube. A Tribute to Alabama’s Storyteller Born in Selma, AL, and raised in nearby Thomasville, Kathryn Tucker Windham is known as “Alabama’s Storyteller.” Windham got her start at the town newspaper reviewing movies and eventually went to work for the Selma Times-Journal, where she won several awards for her writing and photography. Locally, she’s know for her ghost stories

Read More
Web Analytics