On their blog earlier this month, Louisiana's St. Landry Parish did a post about the Southern Foodways Alliance's new boudin exhibit. Never before have we heard the words "boudin" and "exhibit" in the same sentence. South Louisianans just eat tons of the rice and pork mixture stuffed in a sausage casing and don't always think about where it comes from. But starting tomorrow, visitors to the Prairie Acadian Cultural Center in Eunice can find out. "Boudin: The Traveling Exhibit" includes oral histories of storied Louisiana boudin makers to tell the tale of one of South Louisiana's most iconic foods. Funded in part by The McIlhenny Co., makers of Tabasco, the project also includes The Southern Boudin Trail created by the SFA with close to 50 oral histories available online. See "Boudin" through July 23 at the Acadian Cultural Center, open Tuesday-Friday from 8 a.m.-5 p.m. and Saturdays from 8 a.m.-6 p.m. Afterwards, pick up a link at one of the shops featured, like Best Stop or Mowata Store. Photo Credit: St. Landry Parish Tourist Commission

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by Erin Z. Bass A few weeks ago, I heard Travel Channel star and chef Anthony Bourdain was going to be in Lafayette filming for his show, "No Reservations." I didn't know exactly when he'd be here, but figured the local rumor mill would start to churn once he arrived. On Friday afternoon, a few people tweeted they'd seen him at Tsunami Sushi downtown. It didn't take long for y'all to wonder why Anthony Bourdain was eating sushi instead of a poboy or bowl of gumbo, and he actually replied to a few tweets saying he'd only had a beer. To further clarify, he and his crew were staying in the lofts above the restaurant, and Tsunami does serve a crawfish roll. There was no need to worry though. On Bourdain's agenda for Saturday was an all-day boucherie at Lakeview Park in Eunice that included the 6 a.m. butchering of a pig. For those of you not from South Louisiana, a boucherie is an old tradition of making use of all parts of a pig before there were freezers and refrigerators. In communities like Eunice and Mamou, west of Lafayette, neighbors got together and spent the day killing and cleaning the hog,

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On May 20, our good friend Anna Kline in the Mississippi Film office sent out an email about her new song, "Flood Waters." Anna writes the Grits & Soul blog and is the founder and lead singer of a band by the same name. She says the song's lyrics came to her at work one day, so she immediately recorded a rough version of the song into her phone and brought it to band practice in her living room the next day. Her band recorded the song and within a matter of hours, it made its way to Jackson's local news station. Less than a week later, "Flood Waters" was on the air. (Scroll down to listen.) With a chorus that goes: "Ebb and flow, them flood waters creep up slow. The tide it turns, but this got nowhere to go," it's obvious Kline was inspired by the uncertainty of rising flood waters from the Mississippi River recently. Plenty of other Southerners shared her concern, and the song resonated. It's since been played on the air in Memphis, Baton Rouge and caught the interest of CNN. Kline describes the song as having a "bluesy twinge" and says the Grits & Soul band is roots-based,

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by Carol Marks Huntsville, Alabama, may be known for its connection to the space industry, but "The Rocket City" also boasts a booming arts community. You wouldn’t think engineers and artists could get along, but the two communities actually compliment each other quite nicely. The best time to get a feel for Huntsville's dual personalities is on the third Thursday of May, June, July and August, when visitors and locals can see artists, vendors and businesses setting up their displays on the town square for the Sidewalk Art Stroll. This year, the Art Stroll has branched out and is hosting a variety of creative minds, including those growing produce locally. The city's downtown restaurants and pubs open their doors, and a fashion show put on by local clothing boutique Envy, made its way into last month's event. Other sights from the May stroll? Juggling by a local radio deejay. Goin’ To The Cats and Dogs Groomers and Retail Store handing out treats for four-legged attendees. A cooking demo from What’s For Supper and handmade ice cream to beat the heat. The Stroll established itself in 2006 as an experiment of sorts, mainly to attract people to the historic downtown area of Huntsville. In the middle

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by Erin Z. Bass Today, I want to kick off a new summer travel feature. Since I had such a great time on my recent Florida Keys vacation, and discovered so much literary history, I thought we'd start with that. It wasn't a work trip, per se. My cousin was getting married at Hawk's Cay Resort, and my husband and I gladly accepted the invite. But since we figured a long weekend in the Keys wouldn't be enough time to properly explore, we decided to stay the following week. I had never been to Key West or Hemingway's Home, and since we were flying in and out of Miami, we thought we should see some of that beachside city as well. If what you're looking for is luxury, relaxation and someone to bring you drinks by the pool all day, then Hawk's Cay in Duck Key is the place. Located on its own private island, the resort is great for both couples and families with kids. You can go from pool to lagoon and order lunch from the grill overlooking the water, never having to leave the property or sunshine. After a few days though, it's hard to sit still knowing Key

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by Erin Z. Bass On June 12, Alabama lost its beloved storyteller Kathryn Tucker Windham. Unfortunately, I never got the chance to meet Kathryn. I first heard about her while on a tour of rural Alabama a few years ago. Our guide, Linda Vice, told some of Kathryn's stories to us and even took us by her house in Selma, but the storyteller wasn't home. At the Kathryn Tucker Windham Museum in Thomasville, we learned more about her life and legacy in the community. Many of you know we're working on a Southern Literary Trail application here at Deep South, and the museum definitely made our list of literary sites. I'd like to share our app entry on the Kathryn Tucker Windham Museum as a tribute to her today and hope you'll all click here to listen to Kathryn talk about her experience with ghosts on YouTube. A Tribute to Alabama’s Storyteller Born in Selma, AL, and raised in nearby Thomasville, Kathryn Tucker Windham is known as “Alabama’s Storyteller.” Windham got her start at the town newspaper reviewing movies and eventually went to work for the Selma Times-Journal, where she won several awards for her writing and photography. Locally, she’s know for her ghost stories

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by Julie Britt When my cousin, Carol, invited me to spend bicentennial week with her family at Myrtle Beach, I immediately went to J.C. Penney to search for the perfect bathing suit. Carol and I spent a lot of time picking out clothes, shoes and hairstyles that enhanced our feminine allure. Snug tops emphasized perky breasts and slender waists. Tight hot pants hugged our behinds and exposed lengths of tanned legs. We weren’t dressing for sex. That would have been wrong. We were only 17, not to mention unwed. We just wanted potential boyfriends to notice our timely fashion sense and get a hint of what might be theirs if they were patient enough to wait for love in God’s good time. The first day at the beach, we paraded down Ocean Boulevard in our new denim cutoffs and tube tops. We giggled as boys honked, whistled and called out compliments. “Ooh, baby, come to Papa!” “Sweeeeet!” “Marry me, darlin’!” When the compliments turned to raunchy innuendo, we ducked into the Gay Dolphin, a souvenir shop whose inventory included thousands of treasures from the sea — genuine sharks’ teeth, shells of every hue and the mysterious sand dollar with its reminders of our Savior’s sacrifice. We had

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Back-to-back festivals celebrate the state's wine industry in June. by Linda M. Erbele Sometimes you have to wonder if the GPS is really taking you to a winery. There’ve been so many turns since leaving the main road that you don’t know how the mailman finds it, but discovery is part of the delight when visiting Georgia's wine region. Once there, stretch out on the tasting room deck, admire the neat rows of vines behind the hillsides and sip what just might be the next gold medal winner. If your idea of Southern wine is Kool-Aid sweet and made from muscadines, you’re in for a surprise. Georgia is producing Cabernets, Merlots, Viogniers, Chardonnays and a number of excellent blends. “It used to surprise people that Georgia has a whole wine industry that doesn’t involve muscadines,” says Steve Gipson, president of the Georgia Wine Association. A number of the vineyards, especially in North Georgia, grow European varieties of grapes, producing award-winning varietals. “There’s a tremendous amount of interest," continues Gipson. "I think the state lists 32 bonded wineries, and several more are very close to becoming bonded.” Like craft breweries, local wineries produce a product unique to an area, made with a hands-on, personal touch.

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by Kate Spears When Deep South Magazine asked me to do a guest post about what it means to be a Southern belle, I was honored. As the author of a blog called Southern Belle Simple, it makes sense that I should be able to offer some insight. I was also asked to include any inspiration or pearls of wisdom I have gained from Scarlett O’Hara, but from a modern perspective. Since one cannot in good faith speak about being a Southern belle without mentioning Scarlett O, the request seemed perfect. The mere mention of the phrase "Southern belle" evokes vivid images of the old South. Perhaps this is best demonstrated in the opening scene from "Gone with Wind" where a coy Scarlett teases the Tarleton twins on the front porch of Tara, both of them wrapped around her little finger. We can certainly learn from Scarlett to keep our chins up in the face of the greatest adversity as she often made lemonade when life gave her lemons, even if her judgment in some situations would cause us to scratch our heads. As this summer marks the 75th anniversary of the publication of "Gone with the Wind," we should also turn our

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And museums and attractions across the South are celebrating! On June 30, it will have been 75 years since Margaret Mitchell wrote the book that's become a favorite of most every Southerner. Tourist attractions related to Mitchell and "Gone With the Wind" have been preparing for this all year, and "windies," as die-hard fans are called, and those who just enjoy the story of Scarlett and Rhett will have no shortage of ways to celebrate during the month of June and beyond. In Atlanta, there's the opportunity to see a "lost manuscript" of the final four chapters of "Gone With the Wind," as well as the premiere of Georgia Public Broadcasting's new documentary about Margaret Mitchell. In Alabama, fans can see what's being called the most complete collection of "Gone With the Wind" books ever assembled. Vivien Leigh's "Best Actress" Oscar is on display in Arkansas, and even Texans can celebrate with a visit to the Scarlett O'Hardy Museum. Frankly, my dears, we don't give a damn how you commemorate the anniversary, but will say there's no better excuse for a road trip this month. ANNIVERSARY EVENTS CALENDAR Atlanta’s Book: The Lost "Gone With the Wind" Manuscript On display June 4-September 5, 2011 Atlanta History

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