HomePosts Tagged "edgar allan poe" (Page 2)

Upcoming Twitter chat with Michael Morris. Halloween literary fun. Inside the App with Edgar Allan Poe & The Raven Society. The Flannery O'Connor Soundboard in Literary News. A book festival for every weekend in Literary Events & a story about a dead body in Southern Voice. Happy Literary Friday!

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School starting in many locations across the country today got us thinking about those required reading lists. As an adult, you have a second chance to rediscover some of them - on your own time and with no pop quiz afterward.

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With the national popularity of films like The Help and television shows Treme and True Blood, it’s not surprising that Hollywood is going Southern in 2012. Boasting stories of war and competition, alternate history and adaptation of some of the greatest works of Southern literature, 2012 looks to be a banner year for the South on screen. Starting with Dolly Parton, who's starring in Joyful Noise opening today, intern Kati-Jane Hammet has compiled a list of the Southern-themed films and television shows coming out or in the works this year. So, set up your film-going calendar for January through December, which concludes with a huge Southern literary blockbuster on Christmas Day. by Kati-Jane Hammet

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by Erin Z. Bass I recently finished reading "The Beautiful Cigar Girl: Mary Rogers, Edgar Allan Poe, And The Invention Of Murder" by Daniel Stashower. While I've enjoyed reading Poe's short stories and poetry since I first discovered them in high school, I have to admit I didn't know much about the author himself. That is until I read the above-mentioned book. "The Beautiful Cigar Girl" tells the real-life story of the grisly 1841 murder of New York cigar salesgirl Mary Rogers, which Poe used as the basis for his detective story, "The Mystery of Marie Roget." That angle is compelling enough, but author Stashower, known for his biography of Arthur Conan Doyle, weaves in Poe's life story among the events of the murder case. The result is a portrait of an orphaned, alcoholic, self-destructive and under-appreciated writer who tried desperately to achieve fame until the day he died. It's hard to believe that Poe (pictured circa 1904 at right, courtesy of Library of Congress) wasn't famous in his day. He had his moments - upon publication of "The Raven" and "The Gold-Bug" - but they were short-lived. Today, there's no doubt that Poe is the father of the detective story (creating

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