HomePosts Tagged "new orleans" (Page 13)

Today is jazz great Louis Armstrong's birthday. He would have been 110 years old. Born in New Orleans, Louisiana, Armstrong is remembered, and revered, for his gravelly voice, ability to break down racial barriers and timeless songs like "What aWonderful World" and "When the Saints Go Marching In." Each August, New Orleans celebrates the life of its native trumpeter with the Satchmo Summerfest. "Satchmo" was a popular nickname for Armstrong, and the festival kicks off on his birthday and lasts through the weekend. Music featured includes traditional jazz, brass and more, and special events include a club strut, jazz breakfast and Mass, and birthday celebration and trumpet tribute. Seminars on Armstrong and his music are also held during the festival. In honor of Armstrong and his birthday, intern Jake Cole has written a review of a new book about Armstrong, "What a Wonderful World," by Ricky Riccardi, who will be showing rare video footage of Armstrong at a Satchmo Fest seminar tomorrow. Jake has also compiled a list of the 5 essential albums and 10 essential recordings any Armstrong fan or emerging fan should have. So, Happy Birthday Louie. It truly is a wonderful world with your music in it!

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Spotlight on a Southern blog about life in New Orleans. We continue our ongoing feature highlighting blogs throughout the South with one from The Big Easy today. Marketing executive Arthur Smith writes the blog "Calliope Street" from his ground floor apartment on Burgundy and Esplanade Avenue on the edge of the New Orleans French Quarter. Described as "mispronounces about life in New Orleans and the big world beyond," Smith gets into the mispronounces part right away with his choice of blog name. A street that runs through the central part of the city, Calliope is correctly pronounced KAL-ee-ope, and New Orleanians can spot a tourist from a mile away just from their mispronunciation of this word. By the way, Smith's street name of Burgundy is pronounced Bur-GUN-dee. Smith's blog doesn't take itself that seriously, though. Post topics range from a morning walk through the Quarter to activity along the Mississippi River as flood waters were rising and Palm Sunday in the city. The best part? Smith is also an excellent photographer, and most posts are heavy on photos of New Orleans sites and people. We love his photo below, titled "Debauchery at Pontchartrain Beach." Earlier this summer, Smith captured a group of Russians

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By Troy Gilbert and Chef Greg Picolo with Dr. W. Kenneth Holditch reviewed by Erin Z. Bass You may have thought about what it would be like to have dinner with Tennessee Williams. Or maybe you've only thought as far as drinks with the playwright. Regardless, the restaurant would probably be in New Orleans' French Quarter, and you know the conversation would be good. New Orleans native Troy Gilbert and Chef Greg Picolo of Bistro Maison de Ville have taken the idea a step further in their new book, "Dinner With Tennessee Williams," released just in time for what would have been his 100th birthday on March 26. Part food memoir and part cookbook, the book includes more than 80 recipes that would have delighted Williams' on any given evening. Each chapter is based on a play and delves into Williams' references to food, whether it be in "A Streetcar Named Desire," "The Glass Menagerie" or "Cat on a Hot Tin Roof." Tennessee Williams spent his childhood in the Mississippi Delta, eating fried chicken and turnip greens and drinking sweet tea. He came to the New Orleans French Quarter for the first time in 1938 and got a room on the third floor

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by Erin Z. Bass Roadfood's second-annual festival in New Orleans couldn't have asked the culinary gods for better weather or better attendance this year. With the sun shining bright and a cool breeze blowing, Roadfood hit the streets of the French Quarter, kicking off March 27 with the building of the "World's Longest Poboy" in partnership with Louisiana's Oyster Jubilee. After 340 feet of fried oysters and French bread were devoured on Bourbon Street, the Storyville Stompers led the crowd in a second line to the festival a block over on Royal Street. Roadfood's white tents went on for five blocks, serving the best "folk" food from New Orleans and other Roadfood destination restaurants around the country. Roadfood Festival Highlights: Seeing such a feat as the "World's Longest Poboy" and getting a taste of a perfectly fried oyster nestled in fresh French bread and topped with blue cheese from Cafe Reconcile. Perusing the festival's 20 food vendors and trying to decide where to start. The Famous Maine Diner's seafood chowder, packed with scallops, lobster, shrimp and crab, won and did not disappoint. Choosing a sweet treat from Turtle Alley Chocolates, who came all the way from Gloucester, Mass., for the festival. Their caramel-filled chocolate lollipop

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