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A Q&A With Tupelo Poet Patricia Neely-Dorsey by Erin Z. Bass Patricia Neely-Dorsey grew up in Tupelo, Miss., and is a 1982 graduate of Tupelo High School. She attended Boston University, then moved to Memphis for almost 20 years, before returning to her home state in 2007. Moving back into the house she grew up in sparked lots of memories that first year, so much so that Dorsey began to write down her thoughts on paper. Her book of poems, "Reflections Of A Mississippi Magnolia," was published in February of 2008. In honor of National Poetry Month, Dorsey spoke with Deep South about her style of poetry, growing up in Mississippi and how she was influenced by writers like Eudora Welty. With titles like "Mississippi Through and Through, "Southern Man," Right to Vote" and "Making Cracklings," there's no denying the sense of place in Dorsey's writing. You can find several of her poems from the book in our Southern Voice section, and her book is sold on Amazon, at Reed's Gum Tree Bookstore in Tupelo and several other independent bookstores in Mississippi. How did you start writing poetry? I never thought about being a writer. It kind of came to me in my sleep

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The following four poems by Patricia Neely-Dorsey of Tupelo, Mississippi, were taken from her book "Reflections Of A Mississippi Magnolia" in honor of National Poetry Month in April. Read our interview with her here.  Preaching Sunday In the old country church, Preaching Sunday was quite a big deal; In just a few words, I'll give you a feel. White gloved ushers monitor each bench and pew, Wearing uniforms starched to look like brand new. Little girls decked out in ruffles and bows, Sit with mothers in hats sharp From their heads to their toes. The minister quotes scriptures With deep breaths And a long pause, He makes so dramatic each and every clause. At the end of the message, when some hymn is sung, Shouts ring out between every rung. There's jerking and fanning and some falling out, Small ones wonder what all the commotion's about. When everything's over and the service is done, Everyone enjoys a grand feast on the lawn. Neighborhood Groceries Asby's Mayhorn's Cherry Street Pickled Souse Rag Bologna Liver Cheese Dill Pickles in a jar Penny Cookies Coconut Chocolate Chip And Butter Stage Planks Moon Pies Apple Sticks Tootsie Rolls Point out what you want Behind the glass. Service with a smile. Home folks you know. Right to Vote I love to hear the stories, That my mama and daddy tell; Sometimes, we'll just sit a while, And they'll talk for a spell. They've told me of how hard it was, For

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